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(Source: all-star-aria, via foreverbitchgasm)


Timothy McVeigh on the cover of Time Magazine.

Timothy McVeigh on the cover of Time Magazine.

(Source: adamlanzasguns, via a-cat-among-the-crows)

foreverbitchgasm:

The graphic from the T-shirt worn by Timothy James McVeigh in his mugshot

"Sic Semper Tyrannis" - "Thus always to tyrants"

(via enemy-combatant)


Timothy McVeigh with his grandfather, Ed, 1986

Timothy McVeigh with his grandfather, Ed, 1986

(Source: kyrxt)

(Source: enemy-combatant)

(Source: enemy-combatant)

enemy-combatant:

"April 19. 1995, 9:30 a.m. eastern daylight time. Department of Justice, Washington D.C.
The call had been routed from the central switchboard. James Miller, a receptionist in the Executive Secretariat, took it. That was part of his job, answering the “nut line”, so called because that was where  the central switchboard of the Justice Department sent the crank calls and prank calls. People, for instance, who felt like threatening the attorney general, or the United States of America, or the world.  
While Miller was talking on the phone, two fellow employees stopped by his work station. One was Kimberly Tolson, a “correspondence analyst”, the other a courier for the criminal division who had a delivery to make. The courier’s name was Russell Stuart Green. Since Miller was still on the phone, Tolson signed Green’s log sheet for the delivery; Miller, reaching across the desk, time-stamped it.
The time stamp read 9:38 a.m. (Actually, the clock inside the stamp was running six minutes fast. The real Time was 9:32 a.m. eastern daylight time.) 
Miller hung up the phone.
 ”This guy’s saying some federal building in Oklahoma City just blew up,” he told the others. “He’s saying he’s standing across the street, watching it.”
"Yeah, right." Kimberly Tolson said over he shoulder, heading back for her desk, while Green, with a straight face, said "Hey, don’t you think you need to tell somebody about that? Like the President?"
Eight days later James Miller was interviewed by the FBI about this call. Miller quoted the anonymous called as having said, “I’m nobody special. The federal Building in Oklahoma City has just been bombed. I’m standing across the street from it. I can see it from where I’m standing.”
There was only one problem with this, but it was an enormous one. 
The time according to the time stamp on Stuart Green’s log sheet (allowing for the six minute time correction) was 9:32 a.m. eastern day-light time.
That made the time in Oklahoma City 8:32 a.m. central daylight time.
The explosion that destroyed the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, on Fifth Street in Oklahoma City, wouldn’t happen for another thirty minutes.” - Others Unknown: The Oklahoma City Bombing Case and Conspiracy 
Many people believe that the US Government should be held partially accountable for the Oklahoma City Bombing. They say that the government had knowledge of the bombing, and purposely did not act to prevent it.

enemy-combatant:

"April 19. 1995, 9:30 a.m. eastern daylight time. Department of Justice, Washington D.C.

The call had been routed from the central switchboard. James Miller, a receptionist in the Executive Secretariat, took it. That was part of his job, answering the “nut line”, so called because that was where  the central switchboard of the Justice Department sent the crank calls and prank calls. People, for instance, who felt like threatening the attorney general, or the United States of America, or the world.  

While Miller was talking on the phone, two fellow employees stopped by his work station. One was Kimberly Tolson, a “correspondence analyst”, the other a courier for the criminal division who had a delivery to make. The courier’s name was Russell Stuart Green. Since Miller was still on the phone, Tolson signed Green’s log sheet for the delivery; Miller, reaching across the desk, time-stamped it.

The time stamp read 9:38 a.m. (Actually, the clock inside the stamp was running six minutes fast. The real Time was 9:32 a.m. eastern daylight time.) 

Miller hung up the phone.

 ”This guy’s saying some federal building in Oklahoma City just blew up,” he told the others. “He’s saying he’s standing across the street, watching it.”

"Yeah, right." Kimberly Tolson said over he shoulder, heading back for her desk, while Green, with a straight face, said "Hey, don’t you think you need to tell somebody about that? Like the President?"

Eight days later James Miller was interviewed by the FBI about this call. Miller quoted the anonymous called as having said, “I’m nobody special. The federal Building in Oklahoma City has just been bombed. I’m standing across the street from it. I can see it from where I’m standing.”

There was only one problem with this, but it was an enormous one. 

The time according to the time stamp on Stuart Green’s log sheet (allowing for the six minute time correction) was 9:32 a.m. eastern day-light time.

That made the time in Oklahoma City 8:32 a.m. central daylight time.

The explosion that destroyed the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, on Fifth Street in Oklahoma City, wouldn’t happen for another thirty minutes.” - Others Unknown: The Oklahoma City Bombing Case and Conspiracy 

Many people believe that the US Government should be held partially accountable for the Oklahoma City Bombing. They say that the government had knowledge of the bombing, and purposely did not act to prevent it.

nevermindtheb0ll0cks:

Timothy McVeigh was responsible for the Oklahoma Bombings which killed 168 people and injured more than 500.

(via enemy-combatant)

(Source: rebobsessions, via the44caliber)